Make An Impact With A Pop Of Color

I’m a sucker for anything pink. I bought my first iMac because Apple offered it in fuchsia. I got a brand-new KitchenAid in pink, even though my old one still worked. I even bought a car in red raspberry, which is as close to pink as cars come.

So imagine my delight when I walked the floor of the International Home and Housewares Show (IHHS) last week at McCormick Place in Chicago. Down every aisle pastel pinks, blues and purples captivated me while bright red, green and yellow items captured my attention. Everything from kitchen utensils to luggage…small appliances to pet supplies colorfully screamed “notice me.”

What does that have to do with marketing? First, remember that your products themselves are a form of marketing. If two toasters work exactly the same and are priced comparably, but one is more visually appealing to the consumer, the more appealing one tends to sell better. Often, color is the distinguishing factor in the product design. Think avocado green and harvest gold refrigerators in the 1970s.

Second, using color on your packaging can entice shoppers and make your product stand out on the store shelf. Remember original generic packaging with its white labels and plain black lettering? Today, private label store brands—Archer Farms grocery items, Behr paint and West Loop hosiery—are just as colorful as name brands and just as sophisticated.

Finally, don’t forget how important color is to your overall brand. Everyone recognizes McDonald’s golden arches, Coca-Cola’s iconic red, T-Mobile’s magenta, The Home Depot’s orange, and Tiffany blue. Does your brand “own” a color? Try using your signature color not only in your logo but also as an accent on your website and packaging, in your advertising and more…and you’ll quickly separate yourself from your competitors.

Every color evokes different emotions and reactions. Bright pink communicates fun, excitement and confidence while soft pink is associated with romance and sweetness. Choose your brand’s color scheme wisely and never underestimate the impact it will have on your marketing.


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Debbie Szwast
With 20 years of advertising and PR experience, Debbie Szwast understands the multifaceted nature of marketing. A true believer in the art of communication, she acquired an MBA in marketing and a Master’s degree in writing. Today, she calls on the knowledge she has gained over the past two decades to formulate big-picture strategies and execute comprehensive marketing plans for clients across the country.