b2b branding

Using Your Brand Story To Reach Millennials In Business

Millennials are the largest generation in the workforce today and they’re taking on important leadership and decision-making roles. In fact, nearly half of all B2B researchers are Millennials.

As a group, Millennials change jobs much more frequently than previous generations. So every six months, you may find yourself having to reintroduce your brand to a whole new group of buyers.

How do you convey your brand’s core values and competitive advantages in the best light to reach this younger generation of buyers?

In order to connect your brand with today’s prospects and customers, make storytelling a part of your content creation and messaging. Effective storytelling can help share your brand’s values with Millennials in a meaningful way.

Stories Are Memorable

A good story creates lasting impressions of your brand. Stories distinguish your brand from the competition, and consumers are going to remember emotion, characters, and conflict from a story longer than they will remember facts about your product or service.

To put it simply, if you tell a good story that emphasizes who your brand is and what your brand believes in, people will remember it.

Stories Are Easy To Understand

Brand stories are effective, because they inform in a format that readers already know and understand. Stories are made up of three basic components: beginning, middle and end. When developing a brand story, think about those components in terms of the past, present and the future. The past highlights the challenge or the problem that your brand set out to solve. The present showcases how you solve that challenge. And the future demonstrates your success and suggests continuation of that success moving forward.

Click here to learn all there is to know about telling your brand’s story.

Stories Create Trust

Millennials are more likely to connect with a brand when they believe in that brand’s core values. When Millennials are researching a purchase, they are looking at dozens of different companies, each time wondering, “Why should I buy from you?” If you engage those buyers, and answer that question with a story that is built around your core values, then you’ve built an emotional connection and the trust of that customer. 

Stories Show Your Brand’s Personality

Is your brand fun and quirky? Serious? Hip? Thought provoking? Innovative? Intellectual? Dedicated? Whatever it is, your story should reflect that.

Your story should highlight your personality and showcase what is different and unique about your brand. It should demonstrate your values and what motivates and inspires you. This will bring your brand to life and create a human element that allows customers to develop an emotional connection to your brand.

Stories Are Sharable

Strong brand stories will spread through social media. Enhancing your story with visuals and videos will expand the reach of your story and make it even easier for others to share.

Current research shows that 62 percent of Millennials are more likely to buy if a brand engages them online. Sharing your brand story will help build relationships between your brand and the growing group of Millennial buyers.

story branding

Baby Boomers Represent A Wealth Of Opportunities For Homebuying

Marketing Real Estate to Baby Boomers

Gen Y may have surpassed Baby Boomers as the largest share of the homebuying population, but Boomers age 51 to 69 still have significant influence and buying power. According to the National Association of REALTORS®, these “older” buyers have built up equity and are twice as likely to purchase a $500,000-plus home than a Millennial.

Boomers fall into two categories—younger who were born between 1955 and 1964, and older who were born between 1946 and 1954. Combined, they make up the largest segment of home sellers and account for 31% percent of the nation’s homebuyers. Most are married but few have children living at home. They are suburbanites—half live in the ‘burbs while less than 12% choose the city. They purchased now because it was “the right time”—affordability, financing and home availability all ranked low on their reasons to buy. Read more

#WorldsToughestJob Media Strategy

American Greetings Cardstore decided in the Fall of 2013 that it would take its traditional marketing budget and go online instead. This was the beginning of the cards company’s journey in digital media. For Mother’s Day it offered a unique job opportunity to over 15 million viewers and 12 people applied to the job posting.

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What To Know When Including Google+ Into Your Social Media Marketing Plan

When Google announced that they would be releasing a new social media platform, heads turned. Yes, the same Google that completely missed the mark with Google Buzz not too long ago.  Even so, people were intrigued and the hype surrounding the release was contagious. Then the invites went out. People quickly signed up while others awaited their own invites, circles were made, and statuses were updated.

Although Google+ didn’t stop us from logging into Facebook and Twitter daily, it did bring in 400 million registered users – 100 million of which login at least once a month to check on their account. When Google recently nixed the invite only approach and opened the platform for anyone with a Gmail account, the potential for the platform’s growth meant that it was a great time for businesses to incorporate Google+ into marketing plans.

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Homebuilder Marketing: Target Your Homebuyers With A New Media Mix

When pursuing new homebuyers, it’s important to think about their mindset and the tools available for marketing to them during various stages of the buying cycle. Consumers act—and react—differently depending on where they are in the buying process. Radio, TV, magazines, and billboards all can be effective ways to deliver your brand to the masses. But no matter how creative or compelling, your message may be lost if it doesn’t reach those who are ready to receive it. That’s why today, your outreach marketing should concentrate on home shoppers—those defined as actively looking for a home, and prospects—those who have made contact with you either by visiting your sales center or registering online. Read more